http://foreignpolicy.com/2014/02/26/the-human-rights-that-dictators-love. When and why did human rights begin to deny evil?

Proliferation of nuclear weapons, terrorism, imprisonment, torture, no human values are all sustaining foundations of slavery, our Rome.   A communist dictatorship is one which completely ignores the freedom of religion, routinely imprisons monks and artists for their views, and has been criticized by countless human rights organizations for its widespread use of torture and routine abuse of detainees. (In the photo above, policemen prevent a photojournalist from taking pictures outside a courthouse in Ho Chi Minh City.) “Vietnam is fast turning into one of Southeast Asia’s largest prisons for human rights defenders and other activists,” Robert Abbott, Amnesty International’s Vietnam researcher, noted. But these violations are equal, in Shaheed’s eyes, to the ghastly use of cultural artifacts in the tourism industry. The other, more serious violations merit just a one-paragraph rebuke in her report; apparently, they don’t fall within the ill-defined spectrum of “cultural rights.” Now, Vietnam can ignore most of what Shaheed had to say, and brush off her criticisms as a side effect of tourism.  Over the years, critics have ridiculed the U.N. Human Rights Council’s willingness to heed the perverse opinions of the world’s worst dictators, who figure prominently among its members. (These members even tried to ban the word “authoritarian” from council proceedings.) But the farce of “cultural rights” is merely a symptom of a much deeper malaise that some call human rights inflation.” Increasingly, groups have called everything they feel entitled to — from spare bedrooms to foreign aid — a “right.” One special interest group is even clamoring to grant “access to the Internet” official “rights” status, as if freedom of expression weren’t enough. Meanwhile, various parties have asserted their “rights” to employment counseling, paid vacation leave, free education through college, and a global financial tax to combat the economic crisis. Today, we have a surplus of human rights — and they’re all claimed to be equally important and indivisible. Human rights are going nowhere. They’ve lost their value.”

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